Water exporting water Canada bottled water industry exports water

Water is one of a kind natural resource, like wood and coal.

It’s very important because it’s essential to all life on earth. Life would not be able to exist without water, from plants to animals to humans to everything. With water being one of a kind you can’t just really export it to a different country like you can with wood. So, exporting bulk water from Canada to the United States sets forth a controversial topic for people.Exporting water is to send large amount of water from one country to another. Canada has some of the freshest water. Water is being exported out of Canada because Canada has seven percent of the world’s renewable supply of freshwater.

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Canada has a lot of water and majority of the water is streaming to the north. Some states in the United States had experienced drought or water poor for the past few years, creating a market of freshwater that is profitable for Canada. With the climate changing and states in the United States without water there’s a pressure placed on ‘water rich’ countries like Canada to export their water to places that needs them. When exporting water Canada bottled water industry exports water in bulk no more than twenty litres but even that is debatable. It was debated if Canada should stop bulk water exports to the United States because on the contrary as climate change occurs Canada will face economic pressure of its abundant water supplies. Canada has preservations in places to forbid the bulk removal of water from boundary waters, such as the Great Lakes. The Great Lakes are a series of interrelated freshwater lakes located in the upper midwest of North America – Canada and the United States border, containing 21% of the world’s surface fresh water by volume.

Less than one percent of the lakes’ water are renewed yearly by precipitation. It also raises questions about water’s importance in the global market. Canada is often recognized as having such tremendous water that bulk water exports could not importantly change Canada’s water. Canada should treat exporting water the same way they treat wood and coal, it’s as valuable. As climate change elevates – water in many parts of the world especially Canada will face economic trouble to its water supplies. The scientific part indicates that the northern hemisphere will be most affected by climate change than elsewhere.

A few Canadians are disturbed by the idea of shipping fresh water, but others are busy figuring out ways to get as much water out as rapidly and as inexpensively as possible to any other place in the world that wants to buy it. On May 13, 2010 – the Minister of Foreign Affairs postponed an Act to Amend the International Boundary Waters Treaty Act (Transboundary Waters Protection Act), Bill C-26 – the purpose of the bill is to strengthen the prohibition against the bulk removal of water outside of Canada. The impact of regional agreements on water exports that is North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) went into effect on January 1, 1994 which was signed by President George H. W. Bush on December 17, 1992, and approved by Congress on November 20, 1993. North American Free Trade Agreement is to make easier trade between member countries with-in limiting the tariffs and lowering the quotas. Purpose of North American Free Trade Agreement is to promote investment in those regions, the treaty does not establish whether water is a saleable good.

North American Free Trade Agreement was increased by two other commands: the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC) and the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation (NAALC). NAAEC and NAALC agreements were intentional to prevent businesses from impelling to take advantage of lower wages, more lenient laws about worker health and safety, and looser environmental regulations. Aside from everything Donald Trump describes the North American Free Trade Agreement as the single worst trade deal ever approved.With Canada exporting water, North American Free Trade Agreement does not agree whether water is subject to apply to international trade agreements. With North American Free Trade Agreement questioning water as a transportation international trade it does not define it as a ‘good’ because it is provided that a ‘good’ must also be a ‘product’ therefore as oil, machinery, gold, vehicles, fresh produce, livestock and processed foods which comes from Canada and Mexico, which are also the United States’ second and third largest suppliers of imported goods.

Water in water bottle or in zucchinis is however considered a ‘good’ but not just water itself. Therefore, water bulk transported by canal boats, pipeline, and tank trucks should be considered a ‘good’ or ‘product’ under the international law. If North American Free Trade Agreement allows water to be withdrawn from its natural state the same rights must be presented to foreign investors as well, the foreign interests can bring a suit asserting that their rights were disobeyed because Canada must treat National American Free Trade Agreement trading partners the same way Canadians nationals are treated. If water bulk ‘can be’ considered as a good the nation will not be able to ban its’ export unless it employs itself to one of those narrow exceptions. This will allow ‘ water rich’ countries increasing their economics benefits while improving the water security of importing nations. While categorizing water as a good Canada could promote a global water market addressing water uncertainty and limiting ecologic impacts of droughts. Economic integration theory is relevant to this because it’s part of a series on world trade.

Economic integration is the opposite of a close economy. There’s five different stages to economic integration which are free trade, customs union, common market, economic union, and political union. It refers to the degree to which a country trades with other countries, invests in other countries, and allows laborers to move across its borders. Most countries have been increasing their integration with other countries, which is also called globalization.

It happens when a country creates a single market with other countries. Also Customs Union Theory by Jacob Viner it’s “the impact of a customs union into the familiar trade – diversion, trade – creation and consumption effects” (North-Holland). Customs unions are inequitable, it means lowering tariffs within union and combine free trade with protection. When a free trade agrees to have common external tariffs towards non – members, then that is a customs union. The positive of this theory is that the effect of this is greater economic and political integration between states, which results into more peace and cooperation, which is good. The negative of this theory is trade diversion, in which trade is diverted from a more efficient exporter towards a less efficient one by the formation of a free trade agreement.

Rather than exporting water, Canada should proudly take hold of the opportunity to develop a sustainable water policy. Water is one of a kind natural resource, it’s very important because it’s essential to all life on earth. It was debated if Canada should stop bulk water exports to the United States because as climate change occurs Canada will face economic pressure of its abundant water supplies. Also with Canada exporting water the North American Free Trade Agreement does not agree whether water is subject to apply to international trade agreements. It doesn’t apply because it is not considered a good in canal boats, pipeline, and tank trucks but it should be considered a good under the international law.

It doesn’t matter how the water is going out the country it’s more of a question of how much money is coming into Canada in exchange.