Victor novel, Victor’s high stature in society is established

VictorFrankenstein as a tragic hero in Frankenstein                A tragichero is someone whom possesses characteristics which separate them from the normand make them exceptional in some way. These characteristics may include but arenot limited to having a high rank and potential for greatness, having a tragicflaw, and dealing with internal conflict. In the novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelly shows great evidence of how the maincharacter Victor Frankenstein can be identified as a tragic hero. Firstly,Victor’s potential for greatness can be seen throughout the story.

Next, Victor’shamartia centered around his thirst for knowledge eventually leads him to hisdownfall. Lastly, Victor suffers internal conflict which also takes a toll onhis physical health.              Tobegin with, Victor Frankenstein can be seen as someone with the potential forgreatness right from the start of the story.

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Near the beginning of the novel,Victor’s high stature in society is established when he says, “I am by birth aGenevese, and my family is one of the most distinguished of that republic”. Victor,fortunate enough to be born into a happy, enjoyable life, still aimed forexcellence with everything throughout his life. Being born into this wealthy family,Victor is sent to the best university, given the best education and an opportunityto achieve all aspects of knowledge. This exposure to the work of the ancient alchemistsat such a young age is what drives Victor’s obsession for natural science. Howevereven with all his high rank, Victor does notice his difference and privilege fromothers in society. This is evident when he says, “No human could have passed ahappier childhood than myself. My parents were possessed by the very spirit of kindnessand indulgence. We felt that they were not the tyrants to rule our lotaccording to their caprice, but the agents and creators of all the manydelights which we enjoyed.

When I mingled with other families I distinctly discernedhow peculiarly fortunate my lot was, and gratitude assisted the development offilial love.” Victor explains how extremely loving and caring his parents whenhe describes them as the agents and creators of the delights they enjoy ratherthan the tyrants whom rule their lot. He also recognizes how much more privilegedhe was compared to the families whom he mingled with. This shows the readerVictor’s affluent and caring family background. Additionally, Victor, aftercreating the monster, refers to himself as godlike for his creation of life. Victortakes the power of creating life once reserved for god and uses it to createthe monster.

However, Victor even with all his knowledge still lacks theability to see the horror that his creation would bring, unlike God, whom wouldhave seen it. Ultimately, Victor represents a tragic hero as he is seen comingfrom high stature and an affluent family.                         Next,Victor Frankenstein’s hamartia centered around his thirst for knowledge eventuallyleads him to his downfall. Victor clearly has ambition and desire for knowledgethroughout the novel. However, this desire is what causes his grief and sadnessin the end. While Victor was studying at university, the idea of creating lifefrom the dead stayed in the back of his mind. When Victor first creates themonster, he is brought great joy though shortly after being created, the monsteris quickly rejected by Victor as he runs off, leaving the monster on his own.

WhenVictor says, “now that I had finished the beauty of the dream vanished, andbreathless horror and disgust filled my heart.” It shows what Victor trulythinks of the monster. Victor abandons the monster purely based on his appearance.This brings a feeling of isolation and misery to the monster which eventually leadshim to seek revenge, killing those whom meant something to Victor.

Furthermore,Victor avoiding taking responsibility for his creation also contributes to hisdownfall. Without someone to support him, the monster is driven into a state ofhopelessness which eventually turned into anger against his creator. “There wasnone among the myriads of men that existed who would pity or assist me; andshould I feel kindness towards my enemies? No; from that moment I declaredeverlasting war against the species, and more than all, against him who hadformed me and sent me forth to this insupportable misery”. The monster describeshow anyone whom he seeks guidance from he is rejected by.

This rejection is thecause of his hateful feeling towards Victor. Slowly, the monster takes his revenge,bringing devastation to Victor’s life so that Victor too could feel the pain thathe himself was feeling.                         VictorFrankenstein as a tragic hero in Frankenstein                A tragichero is someone whom possesses characteristics which separate them from the normand make them exceptional in some way. These characteristics may include but arenot limited to having a high rank and potential for greatness, having a tragicflaw, and dealing with internal conflict. In the novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelly shows great evidence of how the maincharacter Victor Frankenstein can be identified as a tragic hero. Firstly,Victor’s potential for greatness can be seen throughout the story. Next, Victor’shamartia centered around his thirst for knowledge eventually leads him to hisdownfall. Lastly, Victor suffers internal conflict which also takes a toll onhis physical health.

             Tobegin with, Victor Frankenstein can be seen as someone with the potential forgreatness right from the start of the story. Near the beginning of the novel,Victor’s high stature in society is established when he says, “I am by birth aGenevese, and my family is one of the most distinguished of that republic”. Victor,fortunate enough to be born into a happy, enjoyable life, still aimed forexcellence with everything throughout his life. Being born into this wealthy family,Victor is sent to the best university, given the best education and an opportunityto achieve all aspects of knowledge. This exposure to the work of the ancient alchemistsat such a young age is what drives Victor’s obsession for natural science. Howevereven with all his high rank, Victor does notice his difference and privilege fromothers in society. This is evident when he says, “No human could have passed ahappier childhood than myself.

My parents were possessed by the very spirit of kindnessand indulgence. We felt that they were not the tyrants to rule our lotaccording to their caprice, but the agents and creators of all the manydelights which we enjoyed. When I mingled with other families I distinctly discernedhow peculiarly fortunate my lot was, and gratitude assisted the development offilial love.” Victor explains how extremely loving and caring his parents whenhe describes them as the agents and creators of the delights they enjoy ratherthan the tyrants whom rule their lot.

He also recognizes how much more privilegedhe was compared to the families whom he mingled with. This shows the readerVictor’s affluent and caring family background. Additionally, Victor, aftercreating the monster, refers to himself as godlike for his creation of life. Victortakes the power of creating life once reserved for god and uses it to createthe monster. However, Victor even with all his knowledge still lacks theability to see the horror that his creation would bring, unlike God, whom wouldhave seen it.

Ultimately, Victor represents a tragic hero as he is seen comingfrom high stature and an affluent family.                         Next,Victor Frankenstein’s hamartia centered around his thirst for knowledge eventuallyleads him to his downfall. Victor clearly has ambition and desire for knowledgethroughout the novel. However, this desire is what causes his grief and sadnessin the end.

While Victor was studying at university, the idea of creating lifefrom the dead stayed in the back of his mind. When Victor first creates themonster, he is brought great joy though shortly after being created, the monsteris quickly rejected by Victor as he runs off, leaving the monster on his own. WhenVictor says, “now that I had finished the beauty of the dream vanished, andbreathless horror and disgust filled my heart.” It shows what Victor trulythinks of the monster. Victor abandons the monster purely based on his appearance.This brings a feeling of isolation and misery to the monster which eventually leadshim to seek revenge, killing those whom meant something to Victor. Furthermore,Victor avoiding taking responsibility for his creation also contributes to hisdownfall.

Without someone to support him, the monster is driven into a state ofhopelessness which eventually turned into anger against his creator. “There wasnone among the myriads of men that existed who would pity or assist me; andshould I feel kindness towards my enemies? No; from that moment I declaredeverlasting war against the species, and more than all, against him who hadformed me and sent me forth to this insupportable misery”. The monster describeshow anyone whom he seeks guidance from he is rejected by. This rejection is thecause of his hateful feeling towards Victor. Slowly, the monster takes his revenge,bringing devastation to Victor’s life so that Victor too could feel the pain thathe himself was feeling.                                           VictorFrankenstein as a tragic hero in Frankenstein                A tragichero is someone whom possesses characteristics which separate them from the normand make them exceptional in some way. These characteristics may include but arenot limited to having a high rank and potential for greatness, having a tragicflaw, and dealing with internal conflict.

In the novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelly shows great evidence of how the maincharacter Victor Frankenstein can be identified as a tragic hero. Firstly,Victor’s potential for greatness can be seen throughout the story. Next, Victor’shamartia centered around his thirst for knowledge eventually leads him to hisdownfall. Lastly, Victor suffers internal conflict which also takes a toll onhis physical health.

             Tobegin with, Victor Frankenstein can be seen as someone with the potential forgreatness right from the start of the story. Near the beginning of the novel,Victor’s high stature in society is established when he says, “I am by birth aGenevese, and my family is one of the most distinguished of that republic”. Victor,fortunate enough to be born into a happy, enjoyable life, still aimed forexcellence with everything throughout his life. Being born into this wealthy family,Victor is sent to the best university, given the best education and an opportunityto achieve all aspects of knowledge. This exposure to the work of the ancient alchemistsat such a young age is what drives Victor’s obsession for natural science.

Howevereven with all his high rank, Victor does notice his difference and privilege fromothers in society. This is evident when he says, “No human could have passed ahappier childhood than myself. My parents were possessed by the very spirit of kindnessand indulgence. We felt that they were not the tyrants to rule our lotaccording to their caprice, but the agents and creators of all the manydelights which we enjoyed.

When I mingled with other families I distinctly discernedhow peculiarly fortunate my lot was, and gratitude assisted the development offilial love.” Victor explains how extremely loving and caring his parents whenhe describes them as the agents and creators of the delights they enjoy ratherthan the tyrants whom rule their lot. He also recognizes how much more privilegedhe was compared to the families whom he mingled with.

This shows the readerVictor’s affluent and caring family background. Additionally, Victor, aftercreating the monster, refers to himself as godlike for his creation of life. Victortakes the power of creating life once reserved for god and uses it to createthe monster. However, Victor even with all his knowledge still lacks theability to see the horror that his creation would bring, unlike God, whom wouldhave seen it. Ultimately, Victor represents a tragic hero as he is seen comingfrom high stature and an affluent family.                         Next,Victor Frankenstein’s hamartia centered around his thirst for knowledge eventuallyleads him to his downfall. Victor clearly has ambition and desire for knowledgethroughout the novel.

However, this desire is what causes his grief and sadnessin the end. While Victor was studying at university, the idea of creating lifefrom the dead stayed in the back of his mind. When Victor first creates themonster, he is brought great joy though shortly after being created, the monsteris quickly rejected by Victor as he runs off, leaving the monster on his own.

WhenVictor says, “now that I had finished the beauty of the dream vanished, andbreathless horror and disgust filled my heart.” It shows what Victor trulythinks of the monster. Victor abandons the monster purely based on his appearance.This brings a feeling of isolation and misery to the monster which eventually leadshim to seek revenge, killing those whom meant something to Victor. Furthermore,Victor avoiding taking responsibility for his creation also contributes to hisdownfall. Without someone to support him, the monster is driven into a state ofhopelessness which eventually turned into anger against his creator.

“There wasnone among the myriads of men that existed who would pity or assist me; andshould I feel kindness towards my enemies? No; from that moment I declaredeverlasting war against the species, and more than all, against him who hadformed me and sent me forth to this insupportable misery”. The monster describeshow anyone whom he seeks guidance from he is rejected by. This rejection is thecause of his hateful feeling towards Victor. Slowly, the monster takes his revenge,bringing devastation to Victor’s life so that Victor too could feel the pain thathe himself was feeling.