In will refuse to enter into her sphere; for

Inboth Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre, multiple characters rejectendogamous marriage proposals, usually from family members. In Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth tells MrCollins that they can not marry and that Mr Collins is too ””hasty”‘.1 Itis clear that the two would make an unhappy endogamous marriage not onlybecause she dislikes him, he is her cousin and she would remain at Longbourn,but also because they are physically not suited to each other.2The idea that being physically suited to another is important in a marriage isnot only highlighted through the pairing of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr Collins,but also through the potential marriage of Mr Darcy and Miss de Bourgh.

WhereasMr Collins is described as ‘”solemn”‘,3 Missde Bourgh is described as ‘”pale and sickly”‘ which does not complement Darcy.4It is worth noting that the relationship that nearly was between Darcy’s sisterGeorgiana and Wickham would be endogamous and borderline incestuous as”Georgiana, lonely, shy and repressed, is persuaded to fancy herself inlove, perhaps destined from birth for Wickham, her almost adoptedbrother”.5page number Thereare parallels in the declined proposals in JaneEyre namely between the heroines and their respective partners.6Where Elizabeth declines Mr Collins immediately, there is more of a drawn-outrefusal between Jane Eyre and her cousin, St John Rivers. He, like Mr Collins,is a fraternal figure; however, this makes him more of a well-matched partnerfor Jane, unlike his Pride and Prejudicecounterpart.7Unfortunately, she declines his offer because ‘he would hardly make a goodhusband’.

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8However, it is worth noting the language that the pair use. Where Jane usesmetaphors of fire and ice, St. John Rivers uses metaphors of water and stone.9 Theirlanguage here reflects how they are incompatible as partners as Rivers refusesto enter into Jane’s metaphorical language and thus highlights how he willrefuse to enter into her sphere; for Rivers, Jane would have to abandon herlife and freedom, which, as readers, we know that Jane can not do. In Chapter33, this tension in metaphorical language is exposed:'”But Iapprised you that I was a hard man,” said he; “difficult to persuade.” “And I am a hardwoman, — impossible to put off.

“”And then,” hepursued, “I am cold: no fervour infects me.” “Whereas I am hot, andfire dissolves ice. . . .

” “Well, then,” he said,”I yield; if not to your earnestness, to your perseverance: as stone is worn bycontinual dropping.”(Brontë 390)Asmuch as Brontë did not agree with Austen’s narratives and characters, it is undeniablethat their views on marriage are similar.10 Criticsargue that Austen favoured a move away from a woman’s immediate family creatingan inter-relational marriage to sexualised and non-fraternal relationships.11 Arguably,Brontë must agree with this dogma on some level because Jane goes back to Mr Rochesterand rejects Rivers.InJane Eyre, it is noteworthy that Janeis not the only character to receive an unwanted proposal. Mr Rochester is pairedwith two other women with whom he would and does live out endogamous marriages.

He marries his first wife Bertha for her beauty but also because his father andher family heavily encouraged it.12 Iwould argue that the parental influence on this marriage is what, ultimately,leads it to be unsuccessful as Rochester claims he had no time with Bertha onher own, yet both families were keen for the marriage to go ahead. Itis arguable that the character of Rochester develops so when he meets BlancheIngram, he is forewarned of the dangers of courting and later marrying someonedue to external pressures of maintaining class boundaries. Blanche initiatesthe flirting in Chapter 17, but Rochester tries to engage with her on a metaphoricallevel by evoking the figure of David Rizzio, who was Mary Queen of Scots’ lover.

13 Thisis significant because David Rizzio and Mary Queen of Scots never married andnever would have been able to as Mary was already married which parallels Rochester’smarital status.14 Ifthe two had married, their marriage would have been endogamous because Rochesterwould have stayed at Thornfield and his social circle would have remained thesame.Having explored endogamous marriages in both novels, it is fittingto explore the exogamous, and arguably more successful, pairings. In Pride and Prejudice, the most exogamousmarriage is that of Elizabeth and Darcy.15For this marriage to proceed, Elizabeth has to move away from her family notonly geographically but also in terms of social class and financial status andthis desire for exodus is, potentially, why Darcy comes to be so appealing toher.16This idea is confirmed in Volume III Chapter XVIII:’Elizabeth looked forwardwith delight to the time when they should be removed from society so littlepleasing to either, to all the comfort and elegance of their family party atPemberley.'(Austen 294)1 Jane Austen, Prideand Prejudice, ed. by James Kinsley, New edn.

(Oxford: Oxford UniversityPress, 2004), (p. 82).2Danielle Barkley, ‘Exit strategies: Jane Austen, marriage, and familialescape.’, Persuasions, 36,(2014), (p.

220).3 Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, ed. byJames Kinsley, New edn.

(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004), (p. 81).4 Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, ed. byJames Kinsley, New edn.

(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004),5 Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, ed. byJames Kinsley, New edn. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).6 Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre (Collins Classics) (UK: HarperCollins UK, 2010).

7 Erik IrvingGray, ‘Metaphors and Marriage Plots: Jane Eyre , The Egoist , and MetaphoricDialogue in the Victorian Novel’, Journal of Literature and the History ofIdeas, 12.2, (2014), (p. 280).8 Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre (Collins Classics) (UK: HarperCollins UK, 2010).9 Erik Irving Gray,’Metaphors and Marriage Plots: Jane Eyre , The Egoist , and Metaphoric Dialoguein the Victorian Novel’, Journal of Literature and the History ofIdeas, 12.

2, (2014), (p. 280).10 Margaret Smith, SelectedLetters of Charlotte Brontë, ed.

byMargaret Smith (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007), (p. 99).11 DanielleBarkley, ‘Exit strategies: Jane Austen, marriage, and familial escape.

‘, Persuasions, 36, (2014), (p. 214).12 Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre (Collins Classics) (UK: HarperCollins UK, 2010), (p. 295).13Erik Irving Gray, ‘Metaphors and Marriage Plots: Jane Eyre , TheEgoist , and Metaphoric Dialogue in the Victorian Novel’, Journal ofLiterature and the History of Ideas,12.2, (2014), (p.

271-2).14 Erik Irving Gray, ‘Metaphors andMarriage Plots: Jane Eyre , The Egoist , and Metaphoric Dialogue in theVictorian Novel’, Journal of Literature and the History of Ideas,12.2, (2014), (p. 272)15 DanielleBarkley, ‘Exit strategies: Jane Austen, marriage, and familial escape.

‘, Persuasions, 36, (2014), (p. 215)16 DanielleBarkley, ‘Exit strategies: Jane Austen, marriage, and familial escape.’, Persuasions, 36, (2014), (p. 215)